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Around the summer of 2012, I was organizing the wardrobe trailer on the 2nd season of GIRLS and was listening to NPR.

There was an interview with Elizabeth Cline, author of Overdressed: The Shockingly High Cost of Cheap Fashion.
And as I sifted through and organized, I knew after hearing this interview that fabric re-use and textile repurposing was going to play a big role in the life of ricRACK.
I heard things like...

"There is enough fabric produced every year to wrap around the Earth 3 times." 
"The dyes and chemicals that are in clothing and fabrics release methane when they are decomposing…methane is a harmful greenhouse gas and contributor to global warming." 
So clothing that claims “ wrinkle free” or “stain resistant” means it has been chemically treated.

Americans, just Americans throw away approximately 11 MILLION tons of textiles every year.

And, according to Cline “The process of making textiles has never been green. The technology and regulations to make textile manufacturing less environmentally harmful have improved dramatically in the United States, but the textile industry has largely moved overseas in recent decades to countries that are ill-equipped or simply too poor to reduce the impact of the fiber-making process.”

We started a campaign to reach out to theatres, costumers, production companies, and designers and tell them we were starting to collect donations of unwanted costumes, notions, and fabrics. To date, we have received over 5,000 lbs of fabric, bins of notions, tools, and supplies.

Please support Elizabeth and her campaign to inform consumers:

https://www.facebook.com/search/top/?q=overdressed%3A%20the%20shockingly%20high%20cost%20of%20cheap%20fashion

Published in Blog
Wednesday, 05 April 2017 12:18

In the Beginning...

There were a lot of factions that came together, in a way, to create the perfect storm, aka my passion to create ricRACK.

I didn’t know it then, how it was all going to come together to create what we know now as ricRACK…..a re-sale shop, children’s sewing and repurposing lessons, an  entrepreneur program, free Halloween costume give-aways for kids, adult professional classes, and the grandmother of all wardrobe sales, Hollywood Thrift.

There’s no one impetus, but many things that can be accredited to ricRACK’s identity.

So, I’ll begin with the beginning.

I started wondering, “if kids want to learn how to sew, what resources are available?” If you’re like me, you learned to sew in school, as part of a home economics curriculum.  But, if there’s no more home ec, and a family member doesn’t teach you, where would a youngster go who wants to learn?

I couldn’t find anything locally, so I started searching for information online.

This article by Resurrection Fern affirmed my thoughts, and fanned the flames of the inception of ricRACK.

 

http://resurrectionfern.typepad.com/resurrection_fern/2009/02/when-did-home-economics-disappear-from-our-schools.html

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"Sometime in the 80's our school policy makers decided to extract some important life lessons from our school curriculum and they removed home economics and shop classes from the primary school system.

What has resulted from this is a generation of children who are unable to thread a needle, sew on buttons, cook a simple supper from scratch, wire a lamp, or fix a chair. Unless their parents, grandparents or other family members teach them they will never have the opportunity to learn. I guess they could always try to learn from a book or online tutorial of some sort. Just for fun I googled how to mend and discovered someone has just published a book on this subject that says it will teach you how to thread a needle and sew on a button. I think in these days of renewed interest in frugality every child should learn these basic skills. Along with the iphones, blackberries and notebook computers every child should own a basic little mending kit and know how to use it.

 

  

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The world can no longer hold the heaps of trash created when people throw away perfectly good clothing because it is missing a button or has a tear in the seam. Almost everything can be fixed . "

 

 

Published in Blog
ricRACKnola@gmail.com

2359 St. Claude Ave (next to St. Roch Market)
ph. 504 218 5205
Hours: Mon-Fri 3pm-7pm
(Summer Hours until Sept 4th, Labor Day - unless scheduled classes)
Closed on Sundays

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